NIHM Adult Non-Fiction

National Indigenous History Month

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Blanket toss under midnight sun : portraits of everday life in eight Indigenous communities

Blanket toss under midnight sun : portraits of everday life in eight Indigenous communities

Seesequasis, Paul, author
2019

Blanket Toss Under Midnight Sun consists of approximately 80 archival black-and-white and colour photographs of Indigenous family life from 1925 to 1985, a period of sixty years. The images will portray the resilience and resourcefulness of Indigenous communities across Canada, and will illustrate a way of life that has been diminished or lost in modern times and is little known today. The high-resolution photos will be selected from the works of 12 photographers who spent significant time in each region: Cape Dorset (Kinngait) in Nunavut; Lake Superior Region in Ontario; Plains (Medicine Line) in Southern Alberta, Southern Saskatchewan and Northern Montana; Fort Rae (Bechoko) in the Northwest Territories, and Teslin - Old Crow in the Yukon. The narrative essay for each community will focus on exploration of its history, its families, and its cultural characteristics; including anecdotal stories, profiles of significant individuals, and analysis of how the community adapted to change.

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Call me Indian : from the trauma of residential school to becoming the NHL's first Treaty Indigenous player

Call me Indian : from the trauma of residential school to becoming the NHL's first Treaty Indigenous player

Sasakamoose, Fred, 1933- author
2021

Fred Sasakamoose, torn from his home at the age of seven, endured the horrors of residential school for a decade before becoming one of 120 players in the most elite hockey league in the world. When people tell his story, this is usually where they end it. Sasakamoose's story was far from over. He paved a way for youth to find solace and meaning in sports for generations to come. This ground breaking memoir intersects Canadian history and Indigenous politics, and follows his journey to reclaim pride in an identity that had previously been used against him.

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Day/break : poems

Day/break : poems

Benaway, Gwen, 1987-
2020



Gather

Gather

Van Camp, Richard
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Kwanlin Dün : dǎ kwǎndur ghày ghàkwadîndur = our story in our words.

Kwanlin Dün : dǎ kwǎndur ghày ghàkwadîndur = our story in our words.

2020

"Dä́kwändür Ghay Ghàkwädīndür—Our Story in Our Words tells the story of the peoples of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation, from thousands of years ago to the present day. This richly illustrated book includes traditional stories from long ago, told by Elders, about the origins of the world and the aftermath of a great flood, about “The Double Winter” and “The Girl Who Married the Bear.” Several stories appear in Tlingit, Tagish, Northern Tutchone, or Southern Tutchone, to share these original languages of Kwanlin Dün with the next generation. The lives of early inhabitants of the Southern Yukon are imagined with reference to archaelogical finds and scientific understandings. Elders also share stories about the arrival of white people, about the Gold Rush days and the building of the Alaska Highway, and all the intense challenges that Kwanlin Dün faced. KDFN citizens recall the decades-long land claims struggle that culminated in the KDFN Final Agreements in 2005. And the many nation-building accomplishments since then are celebrated—with an eye to much success ahead. Throughout the book are striking historical pictures, beautiful contemporary artwork, and vivid photographs of the land. Dä́kwändür Ghay Ghàkwädīndür—Our Story in Our Words is a wide-ranging story, told in many unique voices, that celebrates the values, endurance, and accomplishments of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation."-- Provided by publisher.

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Mamaskatch : a Cree coming of age

Mamaskatch : a Cree coming of age

McLeod, Darrel J., author
2018

Growing up in the tiny village of Smith, Alberta, Darrel J. McLeod was surrounded by his Cree family's history. In shifting and unpredictable stories, his mother, Bertha, shared narratives of their culture, their family and the cruelty that she and her sisters endured in residential school. Darrel was comforted by her presence and that of his many siblings and cousins, the smells of moose stew and wild peppermint tea, and his deep love of the landscape. Bertha taught him to be fiercely proud of his heritage and to listen to the birds that would return to watch over and guide him at key junctures of his life. However, in a spiral of events, Darrel's mother turned wild and unstable, and their home life became chaotic. Sweet and innocent by nature, Darrel struggled to maintain his grades and pursue an interest in music while changing homes many times, witnessing violence, caring for his younger siblings and suffering abuse at the hands of his surrogate father. Meanwhile, his older brother's gender transition provoked Darrel to deeply question his own sexual identity. In spite of the traumas of Darrel's childhood, deep and mysterious forces handed down by his mother helped him survive and thrive: her love and strength stay with him to build the foundation of what would come to be a very fulfilling and adventurous life

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A mind spread out on the ground

A mind spread out on the ground

Elliott, Alicia, author
2019

In an urgent and visceral work that asks essential questions about Native people in North America while drawing on intimate details of her own life and experience with intergenerational trauma, Alicia Elliott offers indispensable insight and understanding to the ongoing legacy of colonialism. What are the links between depression, colonialism and loss of language--both figurative and literal? How does white privilege operate in different contexts? How do we navigate the painful contours of mental illness in loved ones without turning them into their sickness? How does colonialism operate on the level of literary criticism? A Mind Spread Out on the Ground is Alicia Elliott's attempt to answer these questions and more.

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Nedí nezų = Good medicine : poems

Nedí nezų = Good medicine : poems

Campbell, Tenille K., author.
2021

nedi nezu (Good Medicine) explores the beautiful space that being a sensual Indigenous woman creates--not only as a partner, a fantasy, a heartbreak waiting to happen but also as an auntie, a role model, a voice that connects to others walking the same path. From the online hookup world of DMs, double taps, and secret texts to earth-shakingly erotic encounters under the northern stars to the ever-complicated relationship Indigenous women have with mainstream society, this poetry collection doesn't shy away from depicting the gorgeous diversity in decolonized desire. Instead, Campbell creates the most intimate of spaces, where the tea is hot and a seat is waiting, surrounded by the tantalizing laughter of aunties telling stories. These wise, jubilant poems chronicle many failed attempts at romance, with the wry humour needed to not take these heartbreaks personally, and the growth that comes from sitting in the silence of living a solo life in a world that insists everyone should be partnered up. With a knowing smile, this book side-eyes the political existence and celebrates the lived experience of an Indigenous woman falling in love and lust with those around her--but, most importantly, with herself. nedi nezu is a smart, sensual, and scandalous collection dripping in Indigenous culture yet irresistible to anyone in thrall to the magnificent disaster that is dating, sex, and relationships.

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Nishga

Nishga

Abel, Jordan, 1985- author
2020

An autobiographical meditation that attempts to address the complicated legacies of Canada's residential school system and contemporary Indigenous existence.

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Peace and good order : the case for Indigenous justice in Canada

Peace and good order : the case for Indigenous justice in Canada

Johnson, Harold, 1957- author
2019

In early 2018, the failures of Canada's justice system were sharply and painfully revealed in the verdicts issued in the deaths of Colten Boushie and Tina Fontaine. The outrage and confusion that followed those verdicts inspired former Crown prosecutor and bestselling author Harold R. Johnson to make the case against Canada for its failure to fulfill its duty under Treaty to effectively deliver justice to Indigenous people, worsening the situation and ensuring long-term damage to Indigenous communities. In this direct, concise, and essential volume, Harold R. Johnson examines the justice system's failures to deliver "peace and good order" to Indigenous people.

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Peyakow

Peyakow

McLeod, Darrel J.
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The Power of Style How Fashion and Beauty are Being Used to Reclaim Cultures.

The Power of Style How Fashion and Beauty are Being Used to Reclaim Cultures.

Allaire, Christian.
2021

Style is not just the clothes on our backs - it is self-expression, representation, and transformation.

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Redbone : the true story of a Native American rock band

Redbone : the true story of a Native American rock band

Staebler, Christian (Illustrator), author
2020

"Brothers Pat and Lolly Vegas were talented Native American rock musicians that took the 1960s Sunset Strip by storm. They influenced The Doors and jammed with Jimmy Hendrix before he was "Jimi," and the idea of a band made up of all Native Americans soon followed. Determined to control their creative vision and maintain their cultural identity, they eventually signed a deal with Epic Records in 1969. But as the American Indian Movement gained momentum the band took a stand, choosing pride in their ancestry over continued commercial reward. Created in cooperation of the Vegas family, authors Christian Staebler and Sonia Paoloni with artist Thibault Balahy take painstaking steps to ensure the historical accuracy of this important and often overlooked story of America's past. Part biography and part research journalism, Redbone provides a voice to a people long neglected in American history." -- Amazon.com.

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Seven fallen feathers : racism, death, and hard truths in a northern city

Seven fallen feathers : racism, death, and hard truths in a northern city

Talaga, Tanya, author
2017

Over the span of ten years, seven high school students died in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The seven were hundreds of miles away from their families, forced to leave their reserve because there was no high school there for them to attend. Tanya Talaga delves into the history of this northern city that has come to manifest, and struggle with, human rights violations past and present against aboriginal communities.

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Storying violence : unravelling colonial narratives in the Stanley trial

Storying violence : unravelling colonial narratives in the Stanley trial

Starblanket, Gina, author.
2020

Storying Violence explores the 2018 murder of Colten Boushie and the subsequent trial of Gerald Stanley. Through an analysis of relevant socio-political narratives in the prairies and scholarship on settler colonialism, the authors argue that Boushie's death and Stanley's acquittal were not isolated incidents but are yet another manifestation of the crisis-ridden relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Saskatchewan, ones that evidence the impossibility of finding justice for Indigenous peoples in settler colonial contexts. We situate Indigenous peoples' presence as a threat to the type of security that settler colonial societies promise settler citizens, pointing to the Stanley case as one instance where such threats are operationalized as mechanisms to sanction violence against Indigenous peoples and communities.

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Warrior life : Indigenous resistance & resurgence

Warrior life : Indigenous resistance & resurgence

Palmater, Pamela D. (Pamela Doris), 1970- author
2020

This is the second collection of writings, Pamela Palmater addresses a range of Indigenous issues - empty political promises, ongoing racism, sexualized genocide, government lawlessness, and the lie that is reconciliation - and makes the complex political and legal implications accessible to the public. This is an unflinching critique of the colonial project that is Canada and a rallying cry for Indigenous peoples and allies alike to forge a path toward a decolonial future through resistance and resurgence.

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