National Indigenous History Month - Kids & Youth

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Abalone woman

Abalone woman

Spathelfer, Teoni, 1963- author.
2022

"A vivid dream teaches Little Wolf about courage and acceptance of those who are different, and inspires her to show her daughters and their classmates how to be proud of their diverse cultural backgrounds. Throughout her life, Little Wolf has been troubled by the injustice she sees all around her. When she was young, she was bullied for her Indigenous heritage. Her mother, White Raven, spent ten years in a residential school, separated from her family and isolated from her culture. Little Wolf's own children are growing up in a different, more open society, but hatred and racism still exist. Little Wolf worries about the world her daughters will inherit. One night, a vivid dream helps her realize her own strength as a leader and peacemaker in her community. Told with powerful imagery and symbolism, Abalone Woman is the third book in the Little Wolf series, which presents themes of racism, trauma, and family unity through relatable, age-appropriate narratives"-- Provided by publisher.

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Aggie & Mudgy : the journey of two Kaska Dena children

Aggie & Mudgy : the journey of two Kaska Dena children

Proverbs, Wendy, author.
2021

When Maddy discovers an old photograph of two little girls in her grandmother's belongings, she wants to know who they are. Nan reluctantly agrees to tell her the story, though she is unsure if Maddy is ready to hear it. The girls in the photo, Aggie and Mudgy, are two Kaska Dena sisters who lived many years ago in a remote village on the BC-Yukon border. Like countless Indigenous children, they were taken from their families at a young age to attend residential school, where they endured years of isolation and abuse. As Nan tells the story, Maddy asks many questions about Aggie and Mudgy's 1,600-kilometre journey by riverboat, mail truck, paddlewheeler, steamship, and train, from their home to Lejac Residential School in central BC. Nan patiently explains historical facts and geographical places of the story, helping Maddy understand Aggie and Mudgy's transitional world.

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Ancestor approved : intertribal stories for kids

Ancestor approved : intertribal stories for kids

2021

A collection of intersecting stories by both new and veteran Native writers bursts with hope, joy, resilience, the strength of community, and Native pride.

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Be a good ancestor

Be a good ancestor

Prince, Leona, author.
2022

"Thought-provoking stanzas encourage readers of all ages to consider they ways in which they live in connection to the world around them and encourages them to think deeply about their behaviors. Rooted in Indigenous teachings, the message delivered by the authors is universal, be a good ancestor to the world around you"-- Provided by publisher.

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Birdsong

Birdsong

Flett, Julie, author, illustrator
2020

When a young girl moves from the country to a small town, she feels lonely and out of place. But soon she meets an elderly woman next door, who shares her love of arts and crafts. Can the girl navigate the changing seasons and failing health of her new friend? Acclaimed author and artist Julie Flett's textured images of birds, flowers, art, and landscapes bring vibrancy and warmth to this powerful story, which highlights the fulfillment of intergenerational relationships and shared passions.

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Borders

Borders

King, Thomas, 1943- author
2021

Borders is a masterfully told story of a boy and his mother whose road trip from Alberta to Salt Lake City is thwarted at the border when they identify their citizenship as Blackfoot. Refusing to identify as either American or Canadian first bars their entry into the US, and then their return into Canada. In the limbo between countries, they find power in their connection to their identity and to each other.

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Coyote tales

Coyote tales

King, Thomas, 1943- author
2017


Firekeeper's daughter

Firekeeper's daughter

Boulley, Angeline, author
2021

Daunis, who is part Ojibwe, defers attending the University of Michigan to care for her mother and reluctantly becomes involved in the investigation of a series of drug-related deaths.

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A girl called Echo. Vol. 4, Road allowance era

A girl called Echo. Vol. 4, Road allowance era

Vermette, Katherena, 1977- author
2021

"In the fourth volume of A Girl Called Echo, Echo Desjardins resumes her time travel and learns more about Métis history in Canada, including the "road allowance" land set aside by the crown, and the former community known as "Rooster Town" in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She also witnesses the trial of Louis Riel in Regina, Saskatchewan."-- Provided by publisher.

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Hunting by stars

Hunting by stars

Dimaline, Cherie, 1975- author
2021

French has been captured by the Recruiters, confined to one of the infamous residential schools, where the government extracts the marrow of Indigenous people in order to steal the ability to dream, and where the captured are programmed to betray others of their kind, something which he discovers has been done to his brother; meanwhile the other survivors, his found family, are hunting for him, determined to rescue him--and French has to decide just how much, and whom, he is willing to sacrifice to survive and be reunited with Rose and the others.

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It's a mitig!

It's a mitig!

George, Bridget, 1994- author, illustrator.
2020

A colourful children's book written in a rhyming combination of English and Ojibwe. It's a Mitig! guides young readers through the forest while introducing them to Ojibwe words for nature. From sunup to sundown, encounter an amik playing with sticks and swimming in the river, a prickly gaag hiding in the bushes and a big, bark-covered mitig. Featuring vibrant and playful artwork, an illustrated Ojibwe-to-English glossary and a simple introduction to the double-vowel pronunciation system, plus accompanying online recordings, It's a Mitig! is one of the first books of its kind. It was created for young children and their families with the heartfelt desire to spark a lifelong interest in learning language.

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On the trapline

On the trapline

Robertson, David, 1977- author
2021

A boy and Moshom, his grandpa, take a trip together to visit a place of great meaning to Moshom. A trapline is where people hunt and live off the land, and it was where Moshom grew up. As they embark on their northern journey, the child repeatedly asks his grandfather, "Is this your trapline?" Along the way, the boy finds himself imagining what life was like two generations ago -- a life that appears to be both different from and similar to his life now. This is a heartfelt story about memory, imagination and intergenerational connection that perfectly captures the experience of a young child's wonder as he is introduced to places and stories that hold meaning for his family.

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Orange Shirt Day, September 30th

Orange Shirt Day, September 30th

2020

On her first day at Residential School, Phyllis Webstad was forced to take off her shiny orange shirt. The shirt was taken away and never returned. Orange Shirt Day was inspired by Phyllis Webstad's story. By wearing an orange shirt on Orange Shirt Day you are helping to send a message that Residential Schools were wrong, and that every child matters.

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Powwow summer

Powwow summer

Shingoose, Nahanni, author
2019

"A coming-of-age story about a teen girl who experiences her Indigenous heritage in a meaningful way. Part Ojibwe and part white, River lives with her white mother and stepfather on a farm in Ontario. Teased about her Indigenous heritage as a young girl, she feels like she doesn't belong and struggles with her identity. Now eighteen and just finished high school, River travels to Winnipeg to spend the summer with her Indigenous father and grandmother, where she sees firsthand what it means to be an "urban Indian." On her family's nearby reserve, she learns more than she expects about the lives of Indigenous people, including the presence of Indigenous gangs and the multi-generational effects of the residential school system. But River also discovers a deep respect for and connection with the land and her cultural traditions. The highlight of her summer is attending the annual powwow with her new friends. At the powwow afterparty, however, River drinks too much and posts photos online that anger people and she has her right to identify as an Indigenous person called into question. Can River ever begin to resolve the complexities of her identity -- Indigenous and not?"-- Provided by publisher.

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Rabbit chase

Rabbit chase

LaPensée, Elizabeth, author
2022

Anishinaabe culture and storytelling meet Alice in Wonderland in this coming-of-age graphic novel that explores Indigenous and gender issues through a fresh yet familiar looking glass. Aimée, a non-binary Anishinaabe middle-schooler, is on a class trip to offer gifts to Paayehnsag, the water spirits known to protect the land. When Aimée accidentally wanders off, they are transported to an alternate dimension populated by traditional Anishinaabe figures in a story inspired by Alice in Wonderland. To gain the way back home, Aimée is called on to help Trickster by hunting down dark water spirits with guidance from Paayehnsag.

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Sky Wolf's call : the gift of Indigenous knowledge

Sky Wolf's call : the gift of Indigenous knowledge

Yellowhorn, Eldon, 1956- author.
2022

"From healing to astronomy to our connection to the natural world, the lessons from Indigenous knowledge inform our learning and practices today. How do knowledge systems get passed down over generations? Through the knowledge inherited from their Elders and ancestors, Indigenous Peoples throughout North America have observed, practiced, experimented, and interacted with plants, animals, the sky, and the waters over millennia. Knowledge keepers have shared their wisdom with younger people through oral history, stories, ceremonies, and records that took many forms. In Sky Wolf's Call, award-winning author team of Eldon Yellowhorn and Kathy Lowinger reveal how Indigenous knowledge comes from centuries of practices, experiences, and ideas gathered by people who have a long history with the natural world. Indigenous knowledge is explored through the use of fire and water, the acquisition of food, the study of astronomy, and healing practices."-- Provided by publisher.

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Tanna's Lemming

Tanna's Lemming

Qitsualik-Tinsley, Rachel
2022


This place : 150 years retold

This place : 150 years retold

2019

Explore the past 150 years through the eyes of Indigenous creators in this groundbreaking graphic novel anthology. Beautifully illustrated, these stories are an emotional and enlightening journey through Indigenous wonderworks, psychic battles, and time travel. See how Indigenous peoples have survived a post-apocalyptic world since Contact.

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Those who run in the sky

Those who run in the sky

Johnston, Aviaq, author
2017


Tuktut innaruqpallianingit / titiraqtuq Maanika Ittuksaarjuat ; titiqtugaqtuq Ima Piitusan = Life cycles of caribou

Tuktut innaruqpallianingit / titiraqtuq Maanika Ittuksaarjuat ; titiqtugaqtuq Ima Piitusan = Life cycles of caribou

Ittusardjuat, Monica, author
2019

"This book shares six Inuktitut terms for caribou throughout their life cycles, giving the youngest of readers an understanding of the rich Inuktitut terminology for these important animals."--Page [4] of cover.

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Walking in two worlds

Walking in two worlds

Kinew, Wab, 1981- author
2021

Bugz is caught between two worlds. In the real world, she's a shy and self-conscious Indigenous teen who faces the stresses of teenage angst and life on the Rez. But in the virtual world, her alter ego is not just confident but dominant in a massively multiplayer video game universe. Feng is a teen boy who has been sent from China to live with his aunt, a doctor on the Rez, after his online activity suggests he may be developing extremist sympathies. Meeting each other in real life, as well as in the virtual world, Bugz and Feng immediately relate to each other as outsiders and as avid gamers. And as their connection is strengthened through their virtual adventures, they find that they have much in common in the real world, too: both must decide what to do in the face of temptations and pitfalls, and both must grapple with the impacts of family challenges and community trauma. But betrayal threatens everything Bugz has built in the virtual world, as well as her relationships in the real world, and it will take all her newfound strength to restore her friendship with Feng and reconcile the parallel aspects of her life: the traditional and the mainstream, the east and the west, the real and the virtual.

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When we are kind

When we are kind

Gray Smith, Monique, 1968- author
2020

This beautiful picture book looks at how the simple act of being kind, to others and oneself, affects all aspects of a child's life.

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The woman in the woods : and other North American stories

The woman in the woods : and other North American stories

2022

Loup Garrou, trickster rabbits, and spirits with names that can't be spoken, the plains and forests of North America are alive with characters like these, all waiting to meet you in this collection of folklore retold in comics! This fifth volume of the "Cautionary Fables and Fairytales" anthology series features updated takes on ancient stories from tribes spanning the continent, bursting with bedside tales that are thrilling, chilling, and most of all inspiring.

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