Upcoming September Titles 2

New popular adult fiction and non-fiction coming out in September listed here!

Click a book to see more info and to request it through our catalogue.

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Bad Law : Rethinking Justice for a Postcolonial Canada.

Bad Law : Rethinking Justice for a Postcolonial Canada.

Reilly, John.
2019

From the bestselling author of Bad Medicine and its sequel Bad Judgment comes a wide-ranging, magisterial summation of the years-long intellectual and personal journey of an Alberta jurist who went against the grain and actually learned about Canada's Indigenous people in order to become a public servant.

"Probably my greatest claim to fame is that I changed my mind," writes John Reilly in this broadly cogent interrogation of the Canadian justice system. Building on his previous two books, Reilly acquaints the reader with the ironies and futilities of an approach to justice so adversarial and dysfunctional that it often increases crime rather than reducing it. He examines the radically different indigenous approach to wrongdoing, which is restorative rather than retributive, founded on the premise that people are basically good and wrongdoing is the aberration, not that humans are essentially evil and have to be deterred by horrendous punishments. He marshalls extensive evidence, including an historic 19th-century US case that was ultimately decided according to Sioux tribal custom, not US federal law.

And then he just comes out and says it: "My proposition is that the dominant Canadian society should scrap its criminal justice system and replace it with the gentler, and more effective, process used by the Indigenous people."

Punishment; deterrence; due process; the socially corrosive influence of anger, hatred and revenge; sexual offences; the expensive futility of "wars on drugs"; the radical power of forgiveness--all of that and more gets examined here. And not in a bloodlessly abstract, theoretical way, but with all the colour and anecdotal savour that could only come from an author who spent years watching it all so intently from the bench.

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Beverley McLachlin : The Legacy of a Supreme Court Chief Justice.

Beverley McLachlin : The Legacy of a Supreme Court Chief Justice.

Greene, Ian.
2019

As a judge, Beverley McLachlin has had an unequalled impact on Canadian life. She stands out for her unique ability to stand up for the values and beliefs that reflect the best of Canada and Canadians.

As chief justice, she led the way to assisted suicide legislation, far greater recognition of aboriginal rights and title, allowing safe injection sites for drug users and many other changes that have had a dramatic impact on Canadian life. Less well known is her work to modify the way the Supreme Court judges work together to emphasize collegiality and to encourage judges on the court to pay closer attention to real-world information about the issues they are considering.

Her courageous action to defend the independence of the court and her own personal integrity when it was attacked by Stephen Harper -- an incident discussed and documented fully in this book -- underlines her strength of character and integrity.

This book sketches Beverley McLachlin's experiences growing up in rural Alberta, attending university, becoming a lawyer and then a judge. At a time when governments were seeking qualified women for senior positions in Canada's courts, she was selected by politicians, both Liberal and Conservative, to fill progressively higher positions. Ian Greene and Peter McCormick focus on her time on the Supreme Court offering readers a balanced, informed perspective on the role she defined for herself, remarkable for her prodigious work and the clarity of her decisions. Their background as leading Canadian writers on the role of the judiciary in Canada allows them to offer an independent and readable appreciation of her contributions to Canadian life.

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Black Cop : My 36 Years in Police Work, and My Career Ending Experiences with Official Racism.

Black Cop : My 36 Years in Police Work, and My Career Ending Experiences with Official Racism.

Lawrence, Calvin.
2019

Throughout his career, Calvin Lawrence experiences hostility and racism within the force - completely contrary to the office values and image of the RCMP. Standing up for his rights gets him blacklisted for advancement, and ultimately leads him to clinical depression arising from workplace hostility and mistreatment. As a seventh-generation Canadian, Lawrence has written a book which lays bare key failures of Canadian police organizations. Residence: Ottawa, ON.

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Crow Winter : A Novel.

Crow Winter : A Novel.

McBride, Karen.
2019

Nanabush. A name that has a certain weight on the tongue--a taste. Like lit sage in a windowless room or aluminum foil on a metal filling.

Trickster. Storyteller. Shape-shifter. An ancient troublemaker with the power to do great things, only he doesn't want to put in the work.

Since coming home to Spirit Bear Point First Nation, Hazel Ellis has been dreaming of an old crow. He tells her he's here to help her, save her. From what, exactly? Sure, her dad's been dead for almost two years and she hasn't quite reconciled that grief, but is that worth the time of an Algonquin demigod?

Soon Hazel learns that there's more at play than just her own sadness and doubt. The quarry that's been lying unsullied for over a century on her father's property is stirring the old magic that crosses the boundaries between this world and the next. With the aid of Nanabush, Hazel must unravel a web of deceit that, if left untouched, could destroy her family and her home on both sides of the Medicine Wheel.

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The Day It Finally Happens : Alien Contact, Dinosaur Parks, Immortal Humans - and Other Possible Phenomena.

The Day It Finally Happens : Alien Contact, Dinosaur Parks, Immortal Humans - and Other Possible Phenomena.

Pearl, Mike.
2019

From a Vice magazine columnist whose beat is "the future," here is entertaining speculation featuring both authoritative research and a bit of mischief: a look at how humanity is likely to weather such happenings as the day nuclear war occurs, the day the global internet goes down, the day we run out of effective antibiotics, and the day immortality is achieved.

If you live on planet Earth you're probably scared of the future. How could you not be? Some of the world's most stable democracies are looking pretty shaky. Technology is invading personal relationships and taking over jobs. Relations among the three superpowers--the US, China, and Russia--are growing more complicated and dangerous. A person watching the news has to wonder: is it safe to go out there or not?

Taking inspiration from his virally popular Vice column "How Scared Should I Be?," Mike Pearl in The Day It Finally Happens games out many of the "could it really happen?" scenarios we've all speculated about, assigning a probability rating, and taking us through how it would unfold. He explores what would likely occur in dozens of possible scenarios--among them the final failure of antibiotics, the loss of the world's marine life, a complete ban on guns in the US, and even the arrival of aliens--and reports back from the future, providing a clear picture of how the world would look, feel, and even smell in each of these instances.

For fans of such bestsellers as What If? and The Worst Case Scenario Survival Handbook, The Day It Finally Happens is about taking future events that we don't really understand and getting to know them in close detail. Pearl makes science accessible and is a unique form of existential therapy, offering practical answers to some of our most worrisome questions. Thankfully, the odds of humanity's pulling through look pretty good.

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For the Love of Men : A New Vision for Mindful Masculinity.

For the Love of Men : A New Vision for Mindful Masculinity.

Plank, Liz.
2019

A nonfiction investigation into masculinity, For The Love of Men provides actionable steps for how to be a man in the modern world, while also exploring how being a man in the world has evolved.

In 2019, traditional masculinity is both rewarded and sanctioned. Men grow up being told that boys don't cry and dolls are for girls (a newer phenomenon than you might realize--gendered toys came back in vogue as recently as the 80s). They learn they must hide their feelings and anxieties, that their masculinity must constantly be proven. They must be the breadwinners, they must be the romantic pursuers. This hasn't been good for the culture at large: 99% of school shooters are male; menin fraternities are 300% (!) more likely to commit rape; a woman serving in uniform has a higher likelihood of being assaulted by a fellow soldier than to be killed by enemy fire.

In For the Love of Men , Liz offers a smart, insightful, and deeply-researched guide for what we're all going to do about toxic masculinity. For both women looking to guide the men in their lives and men who want to do better and just don't know how, For the Love of Men will lead the conversation on men's issues in a society where so much is changing, but gender roles have remained strangely stagnant.

What are we going to do about men? Liz Plank has the answer. And it has the possibility to change the world for men and women alike.

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From Where I Stand Rebuilding Indigenous Nations for a Stronger Canada.

From Where I Stand Rebuilding Indigenous Nations for a Stronger Canada.

Wilson-Raybould, Jody.

Jody Wilson-Raybould outlines in impassioned, inspiring prose the actions that must be taken - by governments, Indigenous Nations, and ordinary Canadians - to achieve true reconciliation in this country.

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Greenwood : A Novel.

Greenwood : A Novel.

Christie, Michael.
2019

From the award-winning author of If I Fall, If I Die comes a propulsive, multigenerational family story, in which the unexpected legacies of a remote island off the coast of British Columbia will link the fates of five people over a hundred years. Cloud Atlas meets The Overstory in this ingenious nested-ring epic set against the devastation of the natural world.

They come for the trees. It is 2038. As the rest of humanity struggles through the environmental collapse known as the Great Withering, scientist Jake Greenwood is working as an overqualified tour guide on Greenwood Island, a remote oasis of thousand-year-old trees. Jake had thought the island's connection to her family name just a coincidence, until someone from her past reappears with a book that might give her the family history she's long craved. From here, we gradually move backwards in time to the years before the First World War, encountering along the way the men and women who came before Jake: an injured carpenter facing the possibility of his own death, an eco-warrior trying to atone for the sins of her father's rapacious timber empire, a blind tycoon with a secret he will pay a terrible price to protect, and a Depression-era drifter who saves an abandoned infant from certain death, only to find himself the subject of a country-wide manhunt. At the very centre of the book is a tragedy that will bind the fates of two boys together, setting in motion events whose reverberations we see unfold over generations, as the novel moves forward into the future once more.
A magnificent novel of inheritance, sacrifice, nature, and love that takes its structure from the nested growth rings of a tree, Greenwood spans generations to tell the story of a family living and dying in the shadows cast by its own secrets. With this breathtaking feat of storytelling, Michael Christie masterfully reveals the tangled knot of lies, omissions, and half-truths that exists at the root of every family's origin story.

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High School

High School

Quin, Sara.
2019

First loves, first songs, and the drugs and reckless high school exploits that fueled them--meet music icons Tegan and Sara as you've never known them before in this intimate and raw account of their formative years.

High School is the revelatory and unique coming-of-age story of Sara and Tegan Quin, identical twins from Calgary, Alberta, growing up in the height of grunge and rave culture in the 90s, well before they became the celebrated musicians and global LGBTQ icons we know today. While grappling with their identity and sexuality, often alone, they also faced academic meltdown, their parents' divorce, and the looming pressure of what might come after high school. Written in alternating chapters from both Tegan's point of view and Sara's, the book is a raw account of the drugs, alcohol, love, music, and friendships they explored in their formative years. A transcendent story of first loves and first songs, it captures the tangle of discordant and parallel memories of two sisters who grew up in distinct ways even as they lived just down the hall from one another. This is the origin story of Tegan and Sara.

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Highway of Tears

Highway of Tears

McDiarmid, Jessica.
2019

A penetrating and deeply moving account of the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls of Highway 16, and a searing indictment of the society that failed them.

For decades, Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been found murdered along an isolated stretch of highway in northwestern British Columbia. The highway is known as the Highway of Tears, and it has come to symbolize a national crisis.

Journalist Jessica McDiarmid meticulously investigates the devastating effect these tragedies have had on the families of the victims and their communities, and how systemic racism and indifference has created a climate where Indigenous women and girls are over-policed, yet under-protected. Through interviews with those closest to the victims--mothers and fathers, siblings and friends--McDiarmid provides an intimate, first-hand account of their loss and unflagging fight for justice. Examining the historically fraught social and cultural tensions between settlers and Indigenous peoples in the region, McDiarmid links these cases to others across Canada--now estimated to number up to 4,000--contextualizing them within a broader examination of the undervaluing of Indigenous lives in the country.

Highway of Tears is a piercing exploration of our ongoing failure to provide justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, and testament to their families and communities' unwavering determination to find it.

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How to Raise a Reader

How to Raise a Reader

Paul, Pamela.
2019

Do you remember your first visit to where the wild things are? How about curling up for hours on end to discover the secret of the Philosopher's Stone? Combining clear, practical advice with inspiration, wisdom, tips, and curated reading lists, How to Raise a Reader, from the authors of the original and viral New York Times Books feature, shows you how to instil the joy and time-stopping pleasure of reading.

Divided into four sections, from baby through teen, and each illustrated by a different artist, this book offers something useful on every page, whether it's how to develop rituals around reading or build a family library, or ways to engage a reluctant reader. A fifth section, 'More Books to Love: By Theme and Reading Level,' is chockful of expert recommendations. Throughout, the authors debunk common myths, assuage parental fears, and deliver invaluable lessons in a positive and easy-to-act-on way.

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The Lost Sister : A Novel.

The Lost Sister : A Novel.

Gunraj, Andrea.
2019

The anticipated sophomore novel from the celebrated author of The Sudden Disappearance of Seetha , which Quill & Quire called "an exciting, memorable debut." Partially inspired by the real-life experiences of a former resident of the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children, The Lost Sister bravely explores the topics of child abuse, neglect, and abduction against a complex interplay of gender, race, and class dynamics.

Alisha and Diana are young sisters living at Jane and Finch, a Toronto suburb full of immigrants trying to build new lives in North America. Diana, the eldest, is the light of the little family, the one Alisha longs to emulate more than anyone else. But when Diana doesn't come home one night and her body is discovered in the woods, Alisha becomes haunted. She thinks she knows who did it, but can't tell anyone about it.

Unable to handle the loss of their daughter and unaware of Alisha's secret guilt, the family unravels. It's only through an unusual friendship with Paula, an older woman who volunteers at her school, that Alisha finds reprieve. Once an orphan in the Nova Scotia Home for Coloured Children and estranged from her own sister, Paula helps Alisha understand that the chance for redemption and peace only comes with facing difficult truths.

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Medical Cannabis in Canada : From Historical Lows to the Current High.

Medical Cannabis in Canada : From Historical Lows to the Current High.

Kimmins, Mark H.
2019

Cannabis has been used by humans for thousands of years. Proven to be safe and medically effective for many conditions, it is emerging from the stigma of being illegal over the last century. Now that it's legal in Canada, the number of people seeking medically specific cannabis products is growing rapidly.

Medical and recreational cannabis are two very distinct streams, however, and there are major differences between the two: from types of product to points of access, applications, dosing - even in the intent to use.

Patients are specifically looking for relief of symptoms without impairment - the high that recreational users seek. Many Canadians have been self-medicating for years, but that is not the safest, most reliable, or most effective way of using cannabis as medicine. Health Canada continues to govern medical cannabis, keeping its use, access, and legislation distinct from the recreational stream.

This book brings clarity for both patients and health care providers (who receive little to no formal education about medical cannabis) and is a comprehensive guide to this re-emerging field of medicine. Clarifies the differences between medical and recreational cannabis. Covers the history, research, and health benefits of cannabis and discusses its application to some 40 specific diseases and symptoms. Explains how to access and use cannabis for medical purposes, as well as the laws that apply specifically to medical cannabis. Features a glossary of key terms, especially useful for patients; Canadian-specific resources; and an extensive reference section citing source material and research from around the world that is guiding medical practice. "Mark, your discussion on medical cannabis is thoughtful, measured and easy to understand. Well done." - C. Dale Mercer, General Surgeon, Professor Emeritus, Queen's University

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The North-West Is Our Mother : The Story of Louis Riel's People, the Métis Nation.

The North-West Is Our Mother : The Story of Louis Riel's People, the Métis Nation.

Teillet, Jean.
2019

There is a missing chapter in the narrative of Canada's Indigenous peoples--the story of the Métis Nation, a new Indigenous people descended from both First Nations and Europeans

Their story begins in the last decade of the eighteenth century in the Canadian North-West. Within twenty years the Métis proclaimed themselves a nation and won their first battle. Within forty years they were famous throughout North America for their military skills, their nomadic life and their buffalo hunts.

The Métis Nation didn't just drift slowly into the Canadian consciousness in the early 1800s; it burst onto the scene fully formed. The Métis were flamboyant, defiant, loud and definitely not noble savages. They were nomads with a very different way of being in the world--always on the move, very much in the moment, passionate and fierce. They were romantics and visionaries with big dreams. They battled continuously--for recognition, for their lands and for their rights and freedoms. In 1870 and 1885, led by the iconic Louis Riel, they fought back when Canada took their lands. These acts of resistance became defining moments in Canadian history, with implications that reverberate to this day: Western alienation, Indigenous rights and the French/English divide.

After being defeated at the Battle of Batoche in 1885, the Métis lived in hiding for twenty years. But early in the twentieth century, they determined to hide no more and began a long, successful fight back into the Canadian consciousness. The Métis people are now recognized in Canada as a distinct Indigenous nation. Written by the great-grandniece of Louis Riel, this popular and engaging history of "forgotten people" tells the story up to the present era of national reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

2019 marks the 175th anniversary of Louis Riel's birthday (October 22, 1844)

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Now You See Me : A Novel.

Now You See Me : A Novel.

McGeorge, Chris.
2019

Six went in...only one came out.

The Standedge Tunnel, the longest canal tunnel in England, has become one of the rural village of Marsden's main tourist attractions. Now it's also a crime scene.

Six students went into the tunnel on a private boat. Two and a half hours later, the boat reappeared at the other end of the tunnel carrying only one of the students, Matthew. He had been knocked unconscious and has no memory of what took place in the tunnel. The police suspect he killed his friends, hid the bodies and later moved them to an undisclosed location. But sitting in a cell awaiting trial, Matthew maintains his innocence.

When Matthew contacts a famous author asking him for help in return for information he claims to possess about the author's long-lost wife, it's an offer that can't be refused. But before the author can prove Matthew's innocence, he must first answer a far more unusual question: How did five bodies disappear into thin air?

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On Division : A Novel.

On Division : A Novel.

Goldbloom, Goldie.
2019

Through one woman's life at a moment of surprising change, the award-winning author Goldie Goldbloom tells a deeply affecting, morally insightful story and offers a rare look inside Brooklyn's Chasidic communityIn Williamsburg, Brooklyn, just a block or two up from the East River on Division Avenue, Surie Eckstein is soon to be a great-grandmother. Her ten children range in age from thirteen to thirty-nine. Her in-laws, postwar immigrants from Romania, live on the first floor of their house. Her daughter Tzila Ruchel lives on the second. She and Yidel, a scribe in such demand that he makes only a few Torah scrolls a year, live on the third. Wed when Surie was sixteen, they have a happy marriage and a full life, and, at the ages of fifty-seven and sixty-two, they are looking forward to some quiet time together. Into this life of counted blessings comes a surprise. Surie is pregnant. Pregnant at fifty-seven. It is a shock. And at her age, at this stage, it is an aberration, a shift in the proper order of things, and a public display of private life. She feels exposed, ashamed. She is unable to share the news, even with her husband. And so for the first time in her life, she has a secret--a secret that slowly separates her from the community.Goldie Goldbloom's On Division is an excavation of one woman's life, a story of awakening at middle age, and a thoughtful examination of the dynamics of self and collective identity. It is a steady-eyed look inside insular communities that also celebrates their comforts. It is a rare portrait of a long, happy marriage. And it is an unforgettable new novel from a writer whose imagination is matched only by the depth of her humanity.

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Our Dogs, Ourselves : The Story of a Singular Bond.

Our Dogs, Ourselves : The Story of a Singular Bond.

Horowitz, Alexandra.
2019

From Alexandra Horowitz, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Inside of a Dog , an eye-opening, informative, and wholly entertaining examination and celebration of the human-canine relationship for the curious dog owner and science-lover alike.

We keep dogs and are kept by them. We love dogs and (we assume) we are loved by them. We buy them sweaters, toys, shoes; we are concerned with their social lives, their food, and their health. The story of humans and dogs is thousands of years old but is far from understood. In Our Dogs, Ourselves , Alexandra Horowitz explores all aspects of this unique and complex interspecies pairing.

As Horowitz considers the current culture of dogdom, she reveals the odd, surprising, and contradictory ways we live with dogs. We celebrate their individuality but breed them for sameness. Despite our deep emotional relationships with dogs, legally they are property to be bought, sold, abandoned, or euthanized as we wish. Even the way we speak to our dogs is at once perplexing and delightful.

In thirteen thoughtful and charming chapters, Our Dogs, Ourselves affirms our profound affection for this most charismatic of animals--and opens our eyes to the companions at our sides as never before.

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Out of Darkness, Shining Light : A Novel.

Out of Darkness, Shining Light : A Novel.

Gappah, Petina.
2019

"Engrossing, beautiful, and deeply imaginative, Out of Darkness, Shining Light is a novel that lends voice to those who appeared only as footnotes in history, yet whose final, brave act of loyalty and respect changed the course of it. An incredible and important book by a masterful writer." ​--Yaa Gyasi, author of Homegoing

"This is how we carried out of Africa the poor broken body of Bwana Daudi, the Doctor, David Livingstone, so that he could be borne across the sea and buried in his own land." So begins Petina Gappah's powerful novel of exploration and adventure in nineteenth-century Africa--the captivating story of the loyal men and women who carried explorer and missionary Dr. Livingstone's body, his papers and maps, fifteen hundred miles across the continent of Africa, so his remains could be returned home to England and his work preserved there. Narrated by Halima, the doctor's sharp-tongued cook, and Jacob Wainwright, a rigidly pious freed slave, this is a story that encompasses all of the hypocrisy of slavery and colonization--the hypocrisy at the core of the human heart--while celebrating resilience, loyalty, and love.

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Red at the Bone : A Novel.

Red at the Bone : A Novel.

Woodson, Jacqueline.
2019

Named one of the Most Anticipated Books of 2019 by LitHub and The Millions.

Called one of the Top 10 Literary Fiction titles of Fall by Publishers Weekly.

An extraordinary new novel about the influence of history on a contemporary family, from the New York Times -bestselling and National Book Award-winning author of Another Brooklyn and Brown Girl Dreaming .

Two families from different social classes are joined together by an unexpected pregnancy and the child that it produces. Moving forward and backward in time, with the power of poetry and the emotional richness of a narrative ten times its length, Jacqueline Woodson's extraordinary new novel uncovers the role that history and community have played in the experiences, decisions, and relationships of these families, and in the life of this child.

As the book opens in 2001, it is the evening of sixteen-year-old Melody's coming of age ceremony in her grandparents' Brooklyn brownstone. Watched lovingly by her relatives and friends, making her entrance to the soundtrack of Prince, she wears a special custom-made dress. But the event is not without poignancy. Sixteen years earlier, that very dress was measured and sewn for a different wearer: Melody's mother, for her own ceremony-- a celebration that ultimately never took place.

Unfurling the history of Melody's parents and grandparents to show how they all arrived at this moment, Woodson considers not just their ambitions and successes but also the costs, the tolls they've paid for striving to overcome expectations and escape the pull of history. As it explores sexual desire and identity, ambition, gentrification, education, class and status, and the life-altering facts of parenthood, Red at the Bone most strikingly looks at the ways in which young people must so often make long-lasting decisions about their lives--even before they have begun to figure out who they are and what they want to be.

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Remembering the Dead : A Penny Brannigan Mystery.

Remembering the Dead : A Penny Brannigan Mystery.

Duncan, Elizabeth J.
2019

Artist and spa owner Penny Brannigan has been asked to organize a formal dinner to mark the centenary of the armistice that ended World War One. After dinner, the guests adjourn to the library for a private exhibition of the Black Chair, a precious piece of Welsh literary history awarded in 1917 to poet Hedd Wyn. But to the guests' shock, the newly restored bardic chair is missing. And then Penny discovers the rain-soaked body of a waiter.

When Penny learns that the victim was the nephew of one of her employees, she is determined to find the killer. Meanwhile, the local police search for the Black Chair. The Prince of Wales is due to open an exhibit featuring the chair in three weeks, so time is not on their side. A visit to a nursing home to consult an ex-thief convinces Penny that the theft of the Black Chair and the waiter's murder are connected. She rushes to Dublin to consult a disagreeable antiquarian, who might know more than he lets on, and during the course of her investigation confronts a gaggle of suspicious travelers and an eccentric herbalist who seems to have something to hide. Can Penny find the chair and the culprit before she is laid to rest in the green grass of Wales?

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Shut Away : When Down Syndrome Was a Life Sentence.

Shut Away : When Down Syndrome Was a Life Sentence.

McKercher, Catherine.
2019

An explosive book that exposes the abuses of institutionalization. "How many brothers and sisters do you have?" It was one of the first questions kids asked each other when Catherine McKercher was a child. She never knew how to answer it.Three of the McKercher children lived at home. The fourth, her youngest brother, Bill, did not. Bill was born with Down syndrome. When he was two and a half, his parents took him to the Ontario Hospital School in Smiths Falls and left him there. Like thousands of other families, they exiled a child with disabilities from home, family, and community.The rupture in her family always troubled McKercher. Following Bill's death in 1995, and after the sprawling institution where he lived had closed, she applied for a copy of Bill's resident file. What she found shocked her.Drawing on primary documents and extensive interviews, McKercher reconstructs Bill's story and explores the clinical and public debates about institutionalization: the pressure to "shut away" children with disabilities, the institutions that overlooked and sometimes condoned neglect and abuse, and the people who exposed these failures and championed a different approach.

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A Trick of Light : A Novel.

A Trick of Light : A Novel.

Lee, Stan.
2019

From Stan Lee, the pop-culture legend behind Marvel's Avengers, Black Panther, X-Men, Spider-Man, Fantastic Four, and Iron Man, comes a major publishing event. One of the last creative acts of a master storyteller, A Trick of Light was first introduced in the best-selling audiobook Stan Lee's Alliances: A Trick of Light . Coming in September, the hardcover features exclusive content, including bonus chapters and an afterword by Alliances universe co-creators Luke Lieberman and Ryan Silbert.

Nia, a gifted but desperately lonely hacker, is living in isolation with her strict single dad. As a social-media maven, she is wildly popular and has more than a million friends. But they are all strangers who love her posts but know nothing about her that is real.

Cameron is on a quest for YouTube fame as a vlogger focusing on exploring the mysteries of Lake Erie. While recording his latest video, he is knocked out by lightning in a freak storm that appears to defy the laws of physics. When Cameron awakens, he discovers an astonishing cyberkinetic talent: the ability to manipulate computers and electronics with his mind.

After a chance meeting online, the two teenagers--one born with extraordinary gifts, one unwillingly transformed--join together to right wrongs in the world. As Nia and Cameron develop their powers and deal out reckonings, they draw the attention of dangerous forces, putting the future of the planet at risk.

Set in Stan Lee's Alliances Universe, co-created by Lee, Luke Lieberman, and Ryan Silbert, and written with Edgar Award-nominated author Kat Rosenfield, Stan Lee delivers a novel packed with the pulse-pounding, breakneck adventure and the sheer exuberant invention that have defined his career as the creative mastermind behind the spectacular Marvel universe.

"Leave it to Stan Lee to save his very best for last. A Trick of Light is as heartfelt and emotional as it is original and exciting. What a movie this one will make." --James Patterson

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A Victory Garden for Trying Times : A Memoir.

A Victory Garden for Trying Times : A Memoir.

Goodwin, Debi.
2019

"A compelling and intimate reflection on love and grief and ordinary things that comfort and sustain us." -- Alison Smith, award-winning journalist



Ever since her childhood on a Niagara farm, Debi has dug in the dirt to find resilience. But when her husband, Peter, was diagnosed with cancer in November, it was too late in the season to seek solace in her garden. With idle hands and a fearful mind, she sought something to sustain her through the months ahead. She soon came across Victory Gardens -- the vegetable gardens cultivated during the world wars that sustained so many.



During an anxious winter, she researched, drew plans, and ordered seeds. In spring, with Peter in remission, her garden thrived and life got back on track. But when Peter's cancer returned like a killing frost, the garden was a reminder that everything must come to an end.



A Victory Garden for Trying Times is a personal journey of love, loss, and healing through the natural cycles of the earth.

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Whose Water Is It, Anyway? : Taking Water Protection into Public Hands.

Whose Water Is It, Anyway? : Taking Water Protection into Public Hands.

Barlow, Maude.
2019

The Blue Communities Project encourages communities around the world to support the idea that water is a shared resource for all. To do this, the project offers resolutions that recognize water and sanitation as human rights, ban or phase out the sale of bottled water in public facilities and at public events, and promote publicly financed, owned, and operated water and wastewater services. Blue Communities is a short, practical handbook on how you can advocate for your community to become a blue community, and gives a history of the movement that started the project.

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Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs? : Big Questions from Tiny Mortals About Death.

Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs? : Big Questions from Tiny Mortals About Death.

Doughty, Caitlin.
2019

Best-selling author and mortician Caitlin Doughty answers real questions from kids about death, dead bodies, and decomposition.

Every day, funeral director Caitlin Doughty receives dozens of questions about death. The best questions come from kids. What would happen to an astronaut's body if it were pushed out of a space shuttle? Do people poop when they die? Can Grandma have a Viking funeral?

In Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs? , Doughty blends her mortician's knowledge of the body and the intriguing history behind common misconceptions about corpses to offer factual, hilarious, and candid answers to thirty-five distinctive questions posed by her youngest fans. In her inimitable voice, Doughty details lore and science of what happens to, and inside, our bodies after we die. Why do corpses groan? What causes bodies to turn colors during decomposition? And why do hair and nails appear longer after death? Readers will learn the best soil for mummifying your body, whether you can preserve your best friend's skull as a keepsake, and what happens when you die on a plane.

Beautifully illustrated by Dianné Ruz, Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs? shows us that death is science and art, and only by asking questions can we begin to embrace it.

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